St Paul Urban Tree & Landscape

Having tree care will promote healthier limbs and structure. Homeowners want their trees to be healthy, so they should always make sure to call a dependable tree service. MN homeowners know that if their trees are not healthy, then it could affect the health of their other landscaping features along with being a danger to their home and family. We supply the best tree care St Paul homeowners can find. We thrive on premium tree health. Our employees are trained and qualified, so your landscaping gets excellent care and maintenance.

 

Tree Services and Tree Care Offered

We are the preferred tree company in the area. Our services include:

St Paul

Saint Paul (/ˌsnt ˈpɔːl/; abbreviated St. Paul) is the capital and second-most populous city of the U.S. state of Minnesota. As of 2016, the city’s estimated population was 304,442.[3] Saint Paul is the county seat of Ramsey County, the smallest and most densely populated county in Minnesota.[5] The city lies mostly on the east bank of the Mississippi River in the area surrounding its point of confluence with the Minnesota River, and adjoins Minneapolis, the state’s largest city. Known as the “Twin Cities”, the two form the core of Minneapolis–Saint Paul, the 16th-largest metropolitan area in the United States, with about 3.52 million residents.[6]

Founded near historic Native American settlements as a trading and transportation center, the city rose to prominence when it was named the capital of the Minnesota Territory in 1849. The Dakota name for Saint Paul is “Imnizaska”. Though Minneapolis (Bdeota) is better-known nationally, Saint Paul contains the state government and other important institutions.[7] Regionally, the city is known for the Xcel Energy Center, home of the Minnesota Wild,[8] and for the Science Museum of Minnesota.[9][10] As a business hub of the Upper Midwest, it is the headquarters of companies such as Ecolab.[11] Saint Paul, along with its Twin City, Minneapolis, is known for its high literacy rate. It was the only city in the United States with a population of 250,000 or more to see an increase in circulation of Sunday newspapers in 2007.[12]

The settlement originally began at present-day Lambert’s Landing, but was known as Pig’s Eye after Pierre “Pig’s Eye” Parrant established a popular tavern there. When Lucien Galtier, the first Catholic pastor of the region, established the Log Chapel of Saint Paul (shortly thereafter to become the first location of the Cathedral of Saint Paul), he made it known that the settlement was now to be called by that name, as “Saint Paul as applied to a town or city was well appropriated, this monosyllable is short, sounds good, it is understood by all Christian denominations”

Urban Tree and Landscaping – Minneapolis Tree Removal by Crane

Urban Tree & Landscape is a full-service tree company based in the Minneapolis/St. Paul metro area. It is family owned and operated by Gabe Tschida who is guided by his core values of honesty, integrity and reliability.  We deliver superior services for homeowners and commercial customers at highly competitive rates.

We have professionally trained tree workers and certified arborists on staff to assist you and your home or business. Our state-of-the-art equipment allows us to provide top quality services on every job we do for our customers. We offer a wide range of tree services including hazardous tree removal, natural disaster recovery, proper pruning and tree maintenance.

Urban Tree can care for trees of all sizes in any location and tackle jobs of any scope. Whether you are a homeowner, a commercial business, a contractor, or a government or educational agency, Urban Tree & Landscape has the experience, staff, equipment, and expertise to take care of all your tree service needs.  Free estimates are always available.

Tree Removal – As simple as it sounds, not all tree removal experts are created equally. Urban Tree and Landscape will take care of your tree problem safely and efficiently. What sets us apart is our communication, reliability, and our commitment to your satisfaction. Our services will keep your trees healthy and vibrant for all to enjoy.

So, Give Urban Tree and Landscape a call for your tree care services at 612-532-9996 or visit on the web at www.utrees.com

Why removing trees by yourself could result in death or serious injury

Tree RemovalTree removal is a challenging task that requires expertise, caution and calculated moves. It may seem a simple task to some but you cannot appreciate its magnitude of the task until you are attempting it, and by then it may be too late, the unfortunate would already have happened and sadly, you may be seriously injured. To avoid injuries when removing a tree in your yard, you need to take some precautions, such as wearing safety equipment, knowing the best time to cut it or to avoid all these troubles hire a tree removal professional. Someone might tell you that removing it on your own will save some costs, but you may end up running into serious losses if it hits your house, car or other valuables. Hiring a professional in Minneapolis or Bloomington or the Twin Cities will ensure that the tree is removed carefully eliminating the dangers of hitting the house or car.

Handling tree removal tools is a challenge that people sometimes encounter. There are tools such as wood chippers, chainsaws, and ropes among other power and hand tools. All these can be dangerous when handled poorly. For example, a chain saw requires total concentration; a slight distraction can lead to cutting the tree at the wrong point or inflicting damage on yourself within a fraction of a second. When these tools are used by somebody who is not familiar with them, distractions easily happen. A slight distraction in the use of a chainsaw, as we have seen above, can cause great damage, and some of these are irreversible, you can have your whole leg or hand cut off. You can cut the tree at the wrong point making it move in an unintended direction. Given that the tree might be huge and heavy, turning it in the required direction might not be possible. This calls for professionals, people who have done this and knows the dangers of distraction and how to avoid it or if you have the courage to do it use safety protection clothes. Although we insist on the use of safety clothes, it’s important to know how to use them as this may make a difference between life and death.

Apart from the tools, the tree itself presents a real danger; because of the risk of falling in the wrong direction, poor climbing, poor support systems, or the possibility of electric lines near the spot among others. Poor handling may lead to a tree falling in the wrong direction hitting a house, car, electric poles or even a passerby. It’s important to ensure that the tree is supported well and at the same time ensure that there are no distractions when using the power or chain saw. Always consider the size of the tree, for the small ones, while using the necessary safety equipment and the right skills, you can probably handle it. For the huge one or those which are near electricity poles, houses or a road, engage a professional as the dangers are real and only an experienced person may handle it well.

As said before, tree removal in Minneapolis may seem an easy task, but the monumental task ahead could be a surprise. A professional tree remover first studies the site and the tree itself, then decides on the strategies to use to fell the tree. He will know the types of tools to use as well as the safety precautions which will be employed. You should always hire a professional, as this will ensure that the job is done well as avoid the possibilities of injuries. Get a professional in Minneapolis, Golden Valley or the twin Cities and eliminate some of the dangers that may come with felling a tree.

Emerald Ash Borer FAQs


  1. Where did the emerald ash borer come from?
  2. How did it get here?
  3. What types of trees does the emerald ash borer attack?
  4. Where has it been found?
  5. What happens to infested ash trees?
  6. What do emerald ash borers look like?
  7. What is the life cycle of this borer?
  8. How is this pest spread?
  9. How long has the emerald ash borer been in Michigan?
  10. Does it only attack dying or stressed trees?
  11. What is being done on a statewide basis about this new pest?
  12. How big a problem is EAB?
  13. Who do I call to get more information on the Emerald Ash Borer or to report an infested tree?

  1. Where did the emerald ash borer come from?
    The natural range of Agrilus planipennis, or the emerald ash borer, is eastern Russia, northern China, Japan, and Korea. Before June of 2002, it had never been found in North America.

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  2. How did it get here?
    We don’t know for sure, but it most likely came in ash wood used for stabilizing cargo in ships or for packing or crating heavy consumer products.

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  3. What types of trees does the emerald ash borer attack?
    In North America, it has only been found in ash trees. Trees in woodlots as well as landscaped areas are affected. Larval galleries have been found in trees or branches measuring as little as 1-inch in diameter. All species of North American ash appear to be susceptible.

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  4. Where has it been found?
    In 2002, EAB was thought to occur in six counties in southeastern Michigan: Livingston, Macomb, Monroe, Oakland, Washtenaw and Wayne, and in Essex County Ontario. Our ability to detect and find EAB has substantially improved since then, however, and we now realize that a much greater area was infested than what was initially thought. Now there are only three counties in Michigan where EAB has not been detected. It has also been found in Illinois, Indiana, Kentucky, Maryland, Minnesota, Missouri, New York, Ohio, Pennsylvania, Virginia, West Virginia, Wisconsin, Ontario and Quebec, making EAB an international pest problem. Most of these infestations are not new (i.e., EAB has not spread this far in the past 5 years). We are simply getting better at finding infestations as survey methods improve. However, it is important to watch for signs and symptoms of EAB in non-quarantine areas where the beetle may have been accidentally transported in ash firewood.

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  5. What happens to infested ash trees?
    The canopy of infested trees begins to thin above infested portions of the trunk and major branches because the borer destroys the water and nutrient conducting tissues under the bark. Heavily infested trees exhibit canopy die-back usually starting at the top of the tree. One-third to one-half of the branches may die in one year. Most of the canopy will be dead within 2 years of when symptoms are first observed. Sometimes ash trees push out sprouts from the trunk after the upper portions of the tree dies. Although difficult to see, the adult beetles leave a “D”-shaped exit hole in the bark, roughly 1/8 inch in diameter, when they emerge in June.

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  6. What do emerald ash borers look like?
    The adult beetle is dark metallic green in color, 1/2 inch-long and 1/8 inch wide. There are several pictures of EAB in the Photo Album and EAB Life Cycle pages.

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  7. What is the life cycle of this borer?
    Recent research shows that the beetle can have a one- or two-year life cycle. Adults begin emerging in mid to late May with peak emergence in late June. Females usually begin laying eggs about 2 weeks after emergence. Eggs hatch in 1-2 weeks, and the tiny larvae bore through the bark and into the cambium – the area between the bark and wood where nutrient levels are high. The larvae feed under the bark for several weeks, usually from late July or early August through October. The larvae typically pass through four stages, eventually reaching a size of roughly 1 to 1.25 inches long. Most EAB larvae overwinter in a small chamber in the outer bark or in the outer inch of wood. Pupation occurs in spring and the new generation of adults will emerge in May or early June, to begin the cycle again. View the EAB life cycle.

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  8. How is this pest spread?
    We know EAB adults can fly at least 1/2 mile from the tree where they emerge. Many infestations, however, were started when people moved infested ash nursery trees, logs, or firewood into uninfested areas. Shipments of ash nursery trees and ash logs with bark are now regulated, and transporting firewood outside of the quarantined areas is illegal, but transport of infested firewood remains a problem. PLEASE – do not move any ash firewood or logs outside of the quarantined area.

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  9. How long has the emerald ash borer been in Michigan?
    No one knows for sure. Experts feel that it may have been in the Detroit area for at least 12 years. The initial infestation probably started from a small number of beetles. Over the next few years, the population began to build and spread. By 2002, many trees in southeastern Michigan were dead or dying. In North America, native ash trees have little or no resistance to EAB and natural enemies have so far had little effect when EAB populations are high.

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  10. Does it only attack dying or stressed trees?
    Healthy ash trees are also susceptible, although beetles may prefer to lay eggs or feed on stressed trees. When EAB populations are high, small trees may die within 1-2 years of becoming infested and large trees can be killed in 3-4 years.

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  11. What is being done on a statewide basis about this new pest?
    Many agencies and universities are working together to educate citizens about identification of ash trees and EAB and options for protecting valuable shade trees. State and federal agencies have programs in place to help restore the urban forest in cities that sustained heavy EAB damage. Research is underway to learn more about the biology of EAB, its rate of spread, methods for EAB detection, predators and other natural enemies that may attack EAB, and how insecticides can be used to protect trees in infested areas.

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  12. How big a problem is EAB?
    EAB is becoming an international problem, with infestations in Canada as well as Michigan, Ohio, Indiana, Illinois, Pennsylvania, Missouri, Wisconsin, Maryland, West Virginia and Virginia. The scope of this problem could reach the billions of dollars nationwide if not dealt with. State and federal agencies have made this problem a priority. Homeowners can also help by carefully monitoring their ash trees for signs and symptoms of EAB throughout the year.

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  13. Who do I call to get more information on the Emerald Ash Borer or to report an infested tree?
    Who do I call to get more information on the Emerald Ash Borer or to report an infested tree? Contact your county Extension office or the nearest Department of Agriculture office. You may also contact the USDA Emerald Ash Borer Hotline toll-free at 1-866-322-4512. Also, check out the “Is EAB in your state?” link at the left of this page.